Benadryl

Discussion in 'Health & General Care' started by SQ, Nov 30, 2019.

Help Support Rat Shack Forum by donating:

  1. Nov 30, 2019 #1

    SQ

    SQ

    SQ

    Senior Member - Vegan for the animals

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,022
    Likes Received:
    1,229
    Location:
    central New Brunswick Canada
    See the CBC video and article at https://www.msn.com/en-ca/health/me...-medicine-cabinets/ar-BBXucOZ?ocid=spartanntp
    - too much can cause difficulty breathing

    Quote:
    “These medications have significant side effects,” explains Doug Mack, a Burlington, Ont., paediatric allergist and assistant clinical professor at McMaster University, who is also on the board of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Immunology. That group published a statement on October 1st, 2019 regarding Benadryl (diphenhydramine) and other older antihistamines such as Atarax (hydroxyzine) and chlorpheniramine (found in some over-the-counter children’s cough and cold remedies), reiterating this recommendation (which allergists have actually been making less formally for years) and laying out the scientific evidence behind it.

    What’s wrong with Benadryl?
    Side effects of Benadryl and other first-generation antihistamines include impaired school performance in kids who use it regularly for seasonal allergies; drowsiness, agitation, hallucinations, and—rarely—seizures and even death. For instance, according to a study using data from 2003, that year, in the US, “there were six reports of fatalities (in children) related to first-generation antihistamine use,” Mack says. When the drug was released back in the 1940s “we didn’t have the same safety standards or requirements before over-the-counter medications were licensed for use,” he adds. And yet, in Canada, the drug is readily available over the counter, and, according to online surveys of physicians and pharmacists, Benadryl was the most recommended antihistamine for kids in each of the last seven years.

    Newer, better antihistamines

    Mack and other allergists say newer antihistamines, which include cetirizine (Reactine), loratadine (Claritin), fexofenadine (Allegra) and desloratidine (Aerius) are actually much safer. (These brands all offer kid-friendly versions). In fact, products with the brand name Benadryl sold outside of the US and Canada actually contain cetirizine, not diphenhydramine.

    What’s more, studies have also demonstrated that these second- and third-generation medications, “actually do a better job,” Mack explains. “They last longer, they work quicker, and they don’t cause the same degree of sedation we find in first-generation antihistamines.” (The one down-side: they cost a bit more, but you can get cheaper generic versions.)
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2019
    PiddlePod likes this.
  2. Nov 30, 2019 #2

    PiddlePod

    PiddlePod

    PiddlePod

    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2018
    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Usa
    I'd like to add that individuals with mast cell activation syndrome, severe allergies and/or reactive pulmonary disorders (eg asthma) may, over time, develop a hypersensitivity to antihistamines.

    Diphenhydramine (Benedryl) is notorious for triggering sudden onset antihistamine hypersensitivity and commonly manifests as urticaria/angioedema, contact dermatitis, anaphylaxis, hives and fixed drug eruption (rash). A second exposure, once hypersensitivity to diphenhydramine is established, is usually more severe than the first.

    Considering that the rat has similar physiological characteristics and responses, it is very possible that they too could develop an antihistamine hypersensitivity to diphenhydramine.

    With that in mind, I'll echo SQ in the suggestion that folks stick with the newer and safer classes of antihistamines that available OTC.
     
  3. Nov 30, 2019 #3

    ViciousCurse

    ViciousCurse

    ViciousCurse

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2019
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    275
    Location:
    Minnesota, USA
    Time to switch allergy pills then, ah! I just switched from Claritin to Benadryl because Claritin wasn't doing it for me :(

    I know you guys aren't allergists by any means, but does this include nasal sprays as well?
     
  4. Nov 30, 2019 #4

    PiddlePod

    PiddlePod

    PiddlePod

    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2018
    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Usa
    I would say that it probably depends on the nasal spray (eg the spray is a corticosteroid, a corticosteroid antihistamine combo, or just a antihistamine) and whether the person has a known antihistamine hypersensitivity or if they're at risk of developing one in the future; only a doctor would be able to give accurate medical advice on that. :)

    Considering that OTC and prescription nasal sprays indicated in the treatment of allergic rhinitis contain second generation H1 antagonists (class of newer antihistamines), I would say that the possibility of developing a hypersensitivity to these second gen antihistamines may offer less of a risk than what has been seen with older/first gen antihistamines. Again, every person is different and hypersensitivites and allergies can come on suddenly and unexpectedly. It's always best to consult a medical professional if you're unsure. :)
     
  5. Nov 30, 2019 #5

    SQ

    SQ

    SQ

    Senior Member - Vegan for the animals

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,022
    Likes Received:
    1,229
    Location:
    central New Brunswick Canada
    Sorry, I have no idea but I would assume that it depends on what is in it
    I posted this because Benadryl is one over the counter meds that is used with rats so we need to be aware of the dangers and look into the possibility of using different medications
    http://ratguide.com/meds/respiratory_drugs/diphenhydramine_hcl.php

    Please read the article (see link in original post), talk to a medial professional and do further research as the article says many medical professionals are unaware of the issues and dangers of this older medication
     

Share This Page