Taking Rats Outdoors ............. Or With You to Places

Dena

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
333
Location
Texas
No offense latte, but it really sounds like you don't have much life experience. SQ is not just coming up with this stuff on her own. It has happened many MANY times where large birds (and even not so large birds) have came right up to the human and snatched the animal. And why would there be poison ivy on a sidewalk?!? Some people don't always take care of their foliage the way you may be thinking. It can grow on fences, trees, all sorts of stuff. She doesn't know if your sidewalks where you live are nice and manicured, or if there is the possibility of growth close to them. So don't gripe about that. Harnesses are not and should not ever be a failsafe in a humans mind. Animals slip out of even the best ones sometimes. Often actually. And the ones for rats are not meant as a safety device. They are just to kinda keep the rat within arms reach. As for dogs, they can, and often DO jump up to get what they want. What if you encounter a much larger, aggressive dog? People suck, and sometimes don't always contain their dogs on a leash, or in their yard. Will you be able to predict when a dog will be out running around? No. There are strays everywhere. So don't jump her case about that either. She is just always looking out for the safety of the rats. But you'll do what you want, I just hope you don't even have to make one of those sad goodbye posts because you wouldn't heed a warning. You have super cute rats, and it would be awesome to see them grow up over time. OK. Rant over.
 

Dena

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Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
333
Location
Texas
Sometimes it's hard to get the tone behind typed words, but I assure you that SQ wants the best for your ratties. If mine came across rude, I apologize, but I don't think you're looking at it from a point of view like we all are. The point is many bad things can happen outside your home that are beyond your control. Within your home, where it's safest, you can better control things. I have personally seen, or had the things happen to me that I've mentioned. That's why I won't even go further than checking my mail with my rats. But again, nobody is saying what you can and can't do with your own pet. :)
 

Rocket99

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Joined
Jun 16, 2018
Messages
45
Location
Massachusetts
I didn't read the OP but I let my rats outside, but only if they want to go out. Some do, some don't. I had a rat that would literally fall of the bed, pull himself (HLD) out of the room, this the house to the slider, open the screen and go outside. But most rats prefer to not go out. You, as the human, need to watch closely for predators, especially birds.
 

Fidget

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2007
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3,308
Location
Victoria BC
Sometimes different points of view aren't about knowledge, just opinion. More experienced people need to be respectful of other's differing views. Less experienced people need to realize that advice is given because others value your baby too..
Some rats can be intimidated or stressed by going to unfamiliar places, some really enjoy the new sights, sounds & smells.
Like with any pet, we have to be cognizant of possible dangers in our house & outside of it, and it's great to have someone experienced point out all the possible dangers as we may not have thought of them all. But we're not going to lock our children in a closet to spare them the dangers of poisons in the house, cars on the road, or shooters at school. We don't need to do it to our pets either. We need to consider them as individuals with varying temperaments and provide them as much new experience as they Desire and is Safe for them..
 

ViciousCurse

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Joined
Jan 28, 2019
Messages
76
Location
Minnesota, USA
I don't understand the argument of immunocompromised or allergic people.

People that are immunocompromised are in danger from their entire surroundings.

There's no more hazard from a rat on your shoulder than a plastic bag blowing by.

Same thing with allergies, it's a far stretch to cause anaphylaxis reaction by being in the vicinity of the alleged allergic person.

A service animal would have a better chance of presenting a risk than a rat on your shoulder.

Which I've seen alleged service animals with aggressive defensive tendencies towards bystanders/ kids.
So I don't buy into the whole service animal thing.

It's up to these people to avoid germs (impossible) or allergies. It's not the general public's responsibility.
What you are describing is not a true service dog. That is someone's untrained pet making a bad example for an entire community of people with disabilities who need these extremely well-trained dogs so they can live relatively normal lives. True service dogs rarely react to anything. True service dogs perform their tasks and do not act aggressively.
This is same for Emotional Support Animal handlers. These people bring animals into public that do not belong there, regardless of the state of their mental health. I have severe depression and I anxiety but I would never bring my untrained dog into a setting he was not trained to handle. That is not fair to him, it is not fair to other people, and I'd just contribute to the cruddy people who illegally misrepresent a service dog (which, might I add is beginning to carry hefty fines in a number of states).

No, it's not the public's responsibility to be courteous of those with compromised immune systems, but it is at least some compassion for those people. But, what I was getting at with allergies and how are rats can inadvertently cause someone harm is if we touch our rats and then touch a food item, either by accident, or because we wanted it and then put it back later. Am I saying you are specifically doing this? No. What I'm saying is this is a form of cross-contamination. Again, my grandmother (who has a seafood allergy) once had a steak and then proceeded to almost go into anaphylaxis because the chefs had prepared her dinner with the same tools created to make seafood.

Anyways, I went off topic.
I'm against bringing rats outside at all unless they're in a carrier or in your pocket or on a leash, however that's strictly my opinion and I can't stop anyone from doing that to their rat. Although, bringing an untrained animal into a space they do not belong is just wrong imo. It is different bringing your dog into any pet store, but when it comes to grocery stores, I just can't see your side. Immunocompromised people need to get their necessities too and we can't bar them off because the world is dangerous to them.
Even with the new drive-up grocery shopping (they order their goods online, pull into a designated spot, and then grocery store employees grocery shop for them), they still run the risk of running into our animals who are brought into stores.
(And then I went off topic again. Oops)
 
Last edited:

Skar

New Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2019
Messages
0
Location
AZ
What you are describing is not a true service dog. That is someone's untrained pet making a bad example for an entire community of people with disabilities who need these extremely well-trained dogs so they can live relatively normal lives. True service dogs rarely react to anything. True service dogs perform their tasks and do not act aggressively.
This is same for Emotional Support Animal handlers. These people bring animals into public that do not belong there, regardless of the state of their mental health. I have severe depression and I anxiety but I would never bring my untrained dog into a setting he was not trained to handle. That is not fair to him, it is not fair to other people, and I'd just contribute to the cruddy people who illegally misrepresent a service dog (which, might I add is beginning to carry hefty fines in a number of states).

No, it's not the public's responsibility to be courteous of those with compromised immune systems, but it is at least some compassion for those people. But, what I was getting at with allergies and how are rats can inadvertently cause someone harm is if we touch our rats and then touch a food item, either by accident, or because we wanted it and then put it back later. Am I saying you are specifically doing this? No. What I'm saying is this is a form of cross-contamination. Again, my grandmother (who has a seafood allergy) once had a steak and then proceeded to almost go into anaphylaxis because the chefs had prepared her dinner with the same tools created to make seafood.

Anyways, I went off topic.
I'm against bringing rats outside at all unless they're in a carrier or in your pocket or on a leash, however that's strictly my opinion and I can't stop anyone from doing that to their rat. Although, bringing an untrained animal into a space they do not belong is just wrong imo. It is different bringing your dog into any pet store, but when it comes to grocery stores, I just can't see your side. Immunocompromised people need to get their necessities too and we can't bar them off because the world is dangerous to them.
Even with the new drive-up grocery shopping (they order their goods online, pull into a designated spot, and then grocery store employees grocery shop for them), they still run the risk of running into our animals who are brought into stores.
(And then I went off topic again. Oops)

I suppose we will just have to disagree on this topic.

I will add it is supposed to be against code to bring any animal into public areas selling food more so grocery.
 

SugarAndSpice

New Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2020
Messages
1
Location
Wisconsin
How long have harness/leash sets have been out there? We haven't had rats in about 4 years. I don't remember seeing them anywhere back then.
When I was on Amazon ordering everything Sugar and Spice would need before they came home, I did come across a harness/leash set. I was all whaaaaaat? People take their prey animal out for a walk? Take them out anywhere? For me, I will take a pass on taking my girls outside or anywhere. They are prey animals. There's so much untrue stigma that people believe about rats. I don't want someone causing a scene in public that's unnecessary.
 

Kye

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
109
Location
Maine
I got my rats as emotional support animals and I take them almost everywhere I go.! They do great out and about and actually enjoy it so I'm not to worried for my animals. They don't run off and most are pretty desensitized to 'scary' sounds but mine could be a special case.
 

triciamaxam74

Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2020
Messages
23
Location
Vancouver BC Canada
My boys love to go out for walks with me, but yes they do always stay on my shoulder! Or in a bag/ purse.
I got my rats as emotional support animals and I take them almost everywhere I go.! They do great out and about and actually enjoy it so I'm not to worried for my animals. They don't run off and most are pretty desensitized to 'scary' sounds but mine could be a special case.
My
I got my rats as emotional support animals and I take them almost everywhere I go.! They do great out and about and actually enjoy it so I'm not to worried for my animals. They don't run off and most are pretty desensitized to 'scary' sounds but mine could be a special case.
My boys are support 100%,if I didn't have them ,AARRGH!!!!!.
 

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SQ

Senior Member - Vegan for the animals
Joined
Jul 21, 2007
Messages
17,197
Location
central New Brunswick Canada
Posting with permission of Christine Fogu LVT

EDUCATIONAL: TAKING PETS OUTDOORS??????

If you take your small pet outdoors, please make sure that you keep it in an enclosure that has a secure top. No matter where you live there are predators, from hawks to dogs, even though you swear they cannot exist-- someone had a hawk swoop down in the middle of a city and take the rat from off of her shoulder. Hawks have the best vision of any animal-- they literally can see the movement of a rat or mouse from a mile away! And they can attain swooping speeds of 150 miles an hour. So she could not have prevented it even if she knew there were hawks within a mile.

There were also three incidents of lost rats in rat groups last summer, and in every case the ending was tragic. It is better to be safe than sorry and keep your beloved babies in a playpen.

Another thing to consider is bugs and parasites. Mosquitoes, ticks and other bugs are not picky as to who they will bite. If you are being bothered by them then chances are your wee friends are too.

Also make sure that wherever you allow them to play there are no dangerous chemicals such as lawn fertilizer insect killer. These can be deadly to our little furry friends.
One more danger is even the deadly virus Sendai, from wilds, which can wipe out your mischief.

And lastly make sure to always provide your pets with shade and water. Even if it is in the low 70's it can still get very warm in the sun, and rats and mice get heatstroke, which can be fatal, very easily.
For journeys we suggest to use a pet stroller. You can then take them for a walk without fear of any of the concerns I listed above.
If your pet is prone to allergies or resp. issues, please keep it inside for its own health and safety.

Also...... many people do not realize that stores may have wild mice. Bringing your pet into these stores exposes your baby to airborne disease that wild rats carry as well as mites and other parasites. So we do not recommend bringing your pets out to stores either.

Posted with permission of Christine Fogu, LVT
 

Weaselsue

Active Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2020
Messages
26
Location
Columbus, Ohio
I take my rats outside. They are clear that they enjoy it, and will ask for it if it has been a while since they have been out by climbing in the carrying specific pouches and carrier after getting my attention. I don't let them wander where dogs are likely to be off leash or where I could not get them quickly. I do also watch for hawks that are in my area. I only take them out of the carrier during the day, so I have the sight advantage and can make sure they don't go anywhere without me noticing. They are always within a few feet of me. There are definitly risks to having pets outside, but I think the rewards are worth it if you take good precautions. Also, it depends on the individual rat, there are some I will not take out, and others who I trust to come back to me when it is time. I also know that I will gladly spend the money and time to get proper care and medication if I do make a mistake. Knowing I am not perfect helps me stay cautious for my girls. I would love to take my babies with me everywhere I go, but rats are a common allergen and most people can reasonably expect not to come into contact with them even if they have allergies. When rats come with me into indoor public spaces, they stay in the carrier, or on my work desk, which I make sure to clean afterwards because others do use it. There are laws about where animals can be, depending on where you are, due to health code reasons, and if a company does not want to allow animals they have a reason for it. As long as service animals are allowed, it is a reasonabe request to make. Please don't be the type of person who make people who have genuine need of service animals look bad because you just feel like taking your pets with you. And don't get a place that you enjoy spening time at into trouble. It is totally reasonable to decide never to take your rats outside as long as you give them plenty of enrichment inside.
 

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